Wedding Colours

In issue 87  Bride and Groom Magazine had a feature on wedding colours and how to incorporate them into your wedding. We were asked to give our expert opinion on a few ways we would suggest you do and now we get to share those answers with you!

Oh! Such Style | Auckland Wedding Stylists
Full Planning and Design | Oh! Such Style Events | Photography | Christina Schmidt Photography | Flowers | Blossom Wedding Flowers

What are some key colours (and colour combos) for summer, autumn, winter and spring? 

Key colours 2015 / 2016

Spring / Sumer – Aquamarine, scuba blue, lucite green, classic blue, toasted almond, strawberry ice, tangerine, custard, marsala, glacier grey

Autumn / Winter –  Dried herb, desert sage, stormy weather, oak buff, marsala, Biscay bay, reflecting pond, cadmium orange, cashmere rose, amethyst orchid

Combos

Spring / Summer – Aquamarine, Fern Green, Gold, Powder Blue, Sweet Peach

Strawberry ice, blush, soft peach, tan

Glacier grey, silver, tan, navy blue

Oak buff, shades of greens and peaches

Toasted almond, nudes and greens

Autumn / Winter – Oak buff, dark blue, olive, grey

Marsala, cashmere rose, blush, cream, grey

Amethyst orchid, cashmere rose, mauve mist, lilac

Grey, burgundy, olive green, blueberry, red

Plum, lavender, emerald, gold,

How should couples choose their wedding colours? Eg, sit down with your partner and look at various swatches to decide what fits in with your season, theme, personal taste.

Venue – Your venue is one of the most important things to consider when choosing your colour palette. You need to think about the existing colours within the space you have booked. Do they fit the natural or “blank canvas” category that would allow you free range with your colour choices or would you say the venue fit into a certain style or theme that you would need to accommodate? It is so important that you choose a palette that will complement your venue as this will avoid too many colours fighting for attention.

Design Concept As tempting as it may be to dive head first into colours, the best palettes are often created from a solid design concept.

While you search for wedding inspiration to match your ideal style, keep tabs of the colours that you are naturally drawn to. If you find you have a large variation in the colours, you could even play around with different combinations of those tones.

Once you’ve tweaked your inspiration images and created a style board it should be easy to see which colours are most predominant. These should form the basis of your colour palette.

To Thy Own Self Be True – Have the confidence to put together colours that work for you and evoke a strong emotional reaction. Don’t feel like you need to keep up with the latest trends. If you have a favourite colour use it. If it doesn’t suit your theme or venue, try and find other shades of the same colour that you could incorporate. Unexpected colour combinations like mint and aubergine can look stunning so don’t be afraid to experiment. The seasons can also be used as a guide for determining your colour palette but just because you’re getting married in winter doesn’t mean you can’t opt for softer tones if that is what brings your ideas to life.


What are some modern/on-trend colours to incorporate into 2016 weddings? And some on-trend colour combinations?

The above colours and combos will go right through this wedding season and into next as Pantone announce their colours for the year in December.


How can couples incorporate their colours into their wedding somehow? (invitations, bridesmaids dresses and suits, table settings, etc)

We have so many tones and shades of colour available that we are able to really allow our creative juices to flow. The most important thing to remember when working with your colour palette is to NOT use just one colour which you try and implement into all details.

This ends up creating a look that is boring and flat, not to mention will drive you nutty trying to colour match everything to that one shade. Less is always more and you can have too much of a good thing, so try to use your main colours as an accent where they will have maximum impact and allow your complementary colours to come in and add that effortless look to your final design.  When introducing a colour to each element, I prefer to match them up. Eg: Invites to match the cake or at least have a detail that follows through. That allows your design to show in each aspect of your wedding without the risk of an aesthetic disaster.

How important is colour in the overall look/style of a wedding?

As one of the most powerful design elements, color can be the thread that ties an entire wedding experience together. It can be used to make a statement, create an atmosphere or evoke emotions. In weddings we use colour to create a style or even just to narrow down potential choices. We can use colour as our starting point as well as our end point by knowing exactly what it is that we are trying to achieve. You will be asked throughout the planning process, “what are your colours” and it’s so easy to get caught up in the idea that you have to have a strict wedding colour palette. Truth is, colour doesn’t have to play the major role that its sometimes made out to be. While your palette will narrow down a lot of your wedding decision and enhance various aspects, you should use it as a guideline instead of a rule. Not every part of your wedding has to match perfectly so don’t stress on having every detail colour coded just right. Instead think of your design in terms of style, formality, texture and mood in addition to colour.


What is the etiquette with having black as one of your wedding colours, albeit non-traditional?

I think as each generation grows we are always pushing the boundaries of what’s acceptable and this is a perfect example.  Gone are the days where black + weddings = taboo!!

These days black is considered a chic colour to add to your palette. Especially if you are going for a monochromatic palette of black and white. Honestly, I don’t think that there is any etiquette we need to follow nowadays and if you really look at it, black has been in our weddings since the 1700’s. The only difference is now we don’t limit using it to the men!

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